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U.S. EPA and CHPS kick off green building design challenge

CHPS to award special recognition for best learning facility concept


For immediate release
Please contact: Ariel Dekovic, 415-970-6604, ariel@chps.net

December 22, 2008 (San Francisco, CA) -The Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating for the second straight year on the Lifecycle Building Challenge, a design competition that rewards for innovative designs that minimize waste, reuse materials and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. CHPS will recognize the best design for projects that achieve these goals for learning facilities and schools.

“Our nation’s buildings are creating a waste crisis, contributing over 100 million tons of construction and demolition debris every year,” Charles Eley, CHPS executive director, said. “School buildings that address this problem address two important impacts on the planet: by reducing the amount of materials that have to be created in the first place, they can reduce their inputs towards both climate change and the waste stream.”

CHPS provides resources for schools for designing, building and operating healthy, environmentally responsible. In the newest version of the California CHPS Criteria, a high performance school building standard for California schools, schools can receive credit for incorporating lifecycle building strategies into their design. EPA led the development of this credit.

The Lifecycle Building Challenge inspires new ways of building that reduce waste, promote materials efficiency, and raise awareness of eco-friendly building practices in the community. Challenge entries are encouraged to employ materials that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy usage, and minimize the repeated use of materials through creating buildings that are both adaptable for other community purposes and easy to disassemble.

In 2008, CHPS awarded an Outstanding Achievement Award to a group of summer interns from HOK in Chicago for their “Transient Awareness Center” project. HOK’s entry proposed a modular educational building largely constructed of recycled materials and powered by
photovoltaic panels. The structure was designed to be erected and subsequently deconstructed in three different locations in the Chicago area without producing any waste.

The “Lifecycle Building Challenge 3” – co-sponsored by the EPA, CHPS, American Institute of Architects, West Coast Green, StopWaste.Org, and WasteCap Wisconsin – invites professionals and students nationwide to submit designs and ideas by August 30 that support cost-effective disassembly and anticipate future reuse of building materials.

For more information about CHPS, visit www.chps.net.

For immediate release

Please contact: Ariel Dekovic, 415-970-6604, ariel@chps.net



December 22, 2008 (San Francisco, CA) -The Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating for the second straight year on the Lifecycle Building Challenge, a design competition that rewards for innovative designs that minimize waste, reuse materials and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. CHPS will recognize the ~order=2008-12-22
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